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Psilocybe

Magic mushrooms, Shooms, Shrooms, liberty caps, mushies

Alcoholic Drinks

Common names

Magic mushrooms, Shooms, Shrooms, liberty caps, mushies.

Generic name

Psilocybe.

Scientific name

Psilocybe semilanceata.

Action

Psychedelic.

Drug form

Small white mushrooms in their natural state, brown when dried, with a distinctive nipple on the cap.

Drug effects

Desired:

Similar to LSD i.e. hallucinations and hilarity - but shorter-acting, 3-5 hours depending on how many are taken.

Side-effects:

Confusion, disorientation, loss of coordination, distortions in time and space.

Risks

Short-term:

Poisoning - from picking a more toxic variety by accident - accidents whilst under the influence, anxiety, emotional distress (bad trip).

Long-term

As with LSD there may exceptionally be some risk of the drug experience releasing or triggering of underlying psychological problems.

Medical use

None.

Legal status

Not illegal in their natural state unless they are 'prepared' for use - e.g. by drying them - when they can become a Class A drug under the Misuse of Drugs Act, 1971.

How is it taken?

Eaten or brewed into a tea.

Paraphernalia

None.

Images

Small white mushrooms in their natural state.
Mushrooms in their dried state.

Where does it come from?

Psilocybe mushrooms grow in all parts of Britain during the autumn. Users may go on a picking spree during this time, dry the mushrooms and store for later use. Some are sold on the illicit market when out of season.

Helping services

Drug advice and counselling agencies offer services to those having problems with their use of magic mushrooms.