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Methadone

Meth, linctus, physeptone, phy amps

Alcoholic Drinks

Common names

Methadone, meth, linctus, physeptone, phy amps.

Generic name

Opioid.

Scientific name

Methadone hydrochloride.

Action

Central nervous system depressant, analgesic.

Drug form

The linctus is a brown liquid containing 2mg of methadone per 5ml of liquid.
Methadone mixture is a thick green syrup (video) containing equal amounts of methadone and liquid.

Injectible

methadone comes as physeptone in ampoules, a clear liquid which is ready to inject.
There are also methadone tablets although these are rarely prescribed.

Drug effects

Desired:

To inhibit opiate withdrawal symptoms, relieve pain.

Side-effects:

Light-headedness, dizziness, sweating, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness.

Medical use

Methadone mixture is used in the management of opiate - mainly heroin - dependence. Methadone linctus is used as a cough suppressant and occasionally as a pain killer.

Risks

Short-term:

Tolerance, overdose which can be fatal. This is a particularly dangerous drug for children who have accidentally taken doses prescribed to their parents.

Long-term:

Dependence.

Legal status

Class A under the Misuse of Drugs Act, 1971.

How is it taken?

The linctus and mixture are taken orally whilst the physeptone ampoules and sometimes the tablets are injected. The tablets are of course designed for oral use.

Paraphernalia

Brown medicine bottles for linctus and mixture and syringes, ampoules, tourniquet etc if injected.

Images

Video of what methadone looks like.
Methadone mixture, a thick green syrup.
Physeptone ampoules.

Where does it come from?

On prescription from a GP or doctor in a drug dependency clinic, or diverted from either.

Helping services

Methadone is widely used in drug substitution programmes offered by drug dependency clinics and sometimes by GP's. Users are also seen by drug counselling agencies and may attend needle exchange schemes despite being on drugs designed to be taken orally.