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Drug Information

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Ketamine

K, special K, vitamin K.

Alcoholic Drinks

Common names

Ketamine, K, special K, vitamin K.

Generic name

Ketamine.

Scientific name

Ketamine hydrochloride.

Action

Psychedelic, anaesthetic.

Drug form

Licit:

When injected this is usually found as a clear liquid in ampoules (brand name Ketalar).

Illicit:

As tablets or powder ranging in colour from off-white to light brown.

Drug effects

Desired:

Ketamine is often sold as ecstasy, so unwitting users would be looking for euphoria, empathy, exhilaration, and energy.

Side-effects:

Drowsiness, dizziness, numbness, loss of coordination, confusion, hallucinations, dissociation -'out-of-the-body' feelings.

Medical use

As a short-acting general anaesthetic.

Risks

Short-term:

Accidents, anxiety, panic attack and/or collapse.

Long-term:

Dependency and its use may also precipitate underlying psychological problems.

Legal status

Not illegal to possess, but supply is prohibited without a prescription.

How is it taken?

Licit:

Intramuscular injection.

Illicit:

Orally as tablets, powder may be snorted up the nose.

Paraphernalia

If snorted: A razor blade may be used on a hard level surface (such as a mirror or glass) with the chopped powder being snorted up a paper tube or rolled banknote. If injected - needles and syringes

Images

Where does it come from?

Diverted from pharmaceutical industry.

Helping services

Counselling agencies see some dance drug users and there are also outreach workers who visit clubs handing out leaflets and making contact with users.