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How Drugs Work

Drugs and the Law

UK Laws

Drug Information

Alcohol
Amphetamines
Cannabis
Cocaine
Codeine
Coffee
Cyclizine
DF118
Diconal
Ecstasy
Ephedrine
GHB
Heroin
Ketamine
Khat
LSD
Methadone
Minor tranquilisers
Morphine
Nicotine
Nitrites
Opiates
Opioids
Opium
Palfium
PCP
Pethedine
Psilocybe
Solvents
Steroids
Temazepam
Temgesic



Coffee

Cappuccino, espresso, latte

Alcoholic Drinks

Scientific name

Caffeine.

Action

Central nervous system stimulant.

Drug form

A brown powder or granules, but caffeine is also contained in many soft drinks and edible products.

Medical use

None.

Drug effects

Desired:

mild stimulation, alertness.

Side-effects:

sleeplessness, tension.

Risks

Short-term:

insomnia, tolerance, overdose.

Long-term:

restlessness, acute anxiety, dependence, withdrawal symptoms if stopped abruptly, irritability, headaches, anxiety. Aggravation of the digestive system and heart problems.

Legal status

Legal to grow, produce, traffick, supply, possess and use.

How is it taken?

Mixed with hot water and brewed into a drink (sometimes sugar and milk may be added), or as a flavouring in various foods.

Paraphernalia

'Coffeepot' for brewing, cups, saucers, spoons, sugar bowl, milk jug.

Images

Various caffeine containing products.

Where does it come from?

Cultivated in many parts of the world, with main commercial production in \P\K5map\kSouth America and East Africa\p.

Helping services

Some people do have serious problems with caffeine. Counselling agencies may be appropriate and have had clients reporting drinking large quantities - many litres daily - of cola drinks containing caffeine.

Heavy coffee drinkers often report headaches and other withdrawal symptoms if they switch to decaffeinated versions. These are temporary and it is very rare though not unknown for coffee "addicts" to present at drug agencies.