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Cannabis

Resin, pot, dope, weed, shit, ganja, puff, blow, draw, grass, herb, hashish, skunk, wacky backy

Alcoholic Drinks

Common names

Cannabis resin, pot, dope, weed, shit, ganja, puff, blow, bob (hope), bush, draw, gold seal, grass, rocky, herb, hemp, hashish, hash, Indica, black, skunk, sensimilla, sensi, sens, bhang, northern lights, haze, zero zero, wacky backy, red seal, temple balls, or by country of origin, e.g. Thai sticks, Lebanese, Leb, Morrocan, Nepalese, Paki black, afghani, Turkish,etc.

Generic names

Cannabis, marijuana.

Scientific names

Cannabis sativa, cannabis indica.

Action

Psychedelic.

Drug form

As the dried plant (herbal (video)) ranging in colour from light green to brown, occasionally containing small grey/brown seeds.

As an extract of the plant (resin (video)), a hard lump or block ranging in colour from light brown to black.

As a thick, sticky oil, which may look dark green, brown or black.

Drug effects

Desired:

Relaxation, euphoria, hilarity.

Side-effects:

Anxiety, paranoia, confusion.

Medical use

The earliest recorded medical use of cannabis was in China, 4,000 years ago, and many cultures have valued its medicinal properties since. Nowadays, a synthetic form, known as marinol or nabilone, is sometimes used as an anti-emetic to control nausea and vomiting. Proponents believe that cannabis could be used to beneficial effect in a range of illnesses from glaucoma to multiple sclerosis (MS). Clinical trials to establish medical value of Cannabis began in the UK 1997.

Risks

Short-term:

Confusion, memory loss, sloth.

Long-term:

Habituation, damage to lung tissue.

Legal status

Resin and herbal: Class B, under the Misuse of Drugs Act, 1971.
Oil: Class A, under the Misuse of Drugs Act, 1971.

How is it taken?

Usually smoked in a hand-made cigarette 'joint'(video), j, reefer or spliff. It is often mixed with tobacco, or in a pipe or water pipe. Other, home-made, devices may also be used for smoking, such as 'hot-knives'(video), where a piece of cannabis is heated between two blades and the smoke drawn off through a hollow tube or 'bottle-neck'. It can also be baked in cakes or other foods and eaten.

Paraphernalia

Tobacco, cigarette papers (Rizlas or skins), cardboard (used for the tip, known as a roach), pipes or bongs.

Images

Cannabis in general.
Cannabis resin.
Cannabis herbal.
Cannabis oil.
Pipes, papers, scales etc.
Video of cannabis resin.
Video of cannabis in bags.

Rolling a Joint.
Preparing a joint - video.
Sticking cigarette papers together.
Heating the resin over the joint.
Rolling up the joint.
Putting in the cardboard filter.
The finished product.

Hot knives.
Video of smoking cannabis using hot knives.
Heating the knives.
Placing the cannabis on the knife.
Drawing off the smoke.

Where does it come from?

Cannabis grows in many parts of the world. See the \P\K1map\kmap\p, but the main centres of commercial production include north and west Africa, south America, middle and far East. Increasingly being grown indoors in Europe.

Helping services

Very few cannabis users have other than legal problems with their use of the drug. There are a small number of inexperienced cannabis users who do drop in to community drug services usually after taking quite a lot of the drug on their first or second try.

Many parents and relatives of cannabis users will also contact these agencies for advice on how to deal with a son or daughter using the drug. Finally there are a small number of very heavy users who would like to stop but find it very difficult. They may benefit from counselling support.